Why does Romeo not want to fight Tybalt? A) ... What does Mercutio mean by "a plague o' both your houses"? A) a curse on the Montagues and Capulets B) ...

Why does Romeo not want to fight Tybalt? A) ... What does Mercutio mean by "a plague o' both your houses"? A) a curse on the Montagues and Capulets B) ... MERCUTIO I am hurt. A plague o' both your houses! I am sped. Is he gone and hath nothing? MERCUTIO I’ve been hurt. May a plague curse both your families. I’m finished. Did he get away clean? BENVOLIO What, art thou hurt? BENVOLIO What, are you hurt? MERCUTIO Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch. Marry, ’tis enough. Where is my page?—Go, villain ... Romeo has just married Juliet and is now an in-law to Tybalt. Why does Mercutio curse the houses of the feuding families, saying "A plague a' both your houses!" He blames the feud for his death. He curses both houses for causing his death. .

At the same time, however, the dialogue between Romeo and Juliet takes the form of a sonnet (up to the point where they kiss), which is incredibly romantic. So, while Romeo's moves are a bit predictable, we can also recognize that Romeo and Juliet's romance has the potential to be anything but conventional. What does Mercutio mean when he says, "A plague a both your houses!/They have made worms' meat of me." ... Curse both the Capulets and the Montegues. It has killed me.

It means that Mercutio is cursing both of the houses (Montague and Capulet), and basically blaming both of them for his untimely death in A3S1. Romeo feels that he is to blame, and this is probably...

10. Why does Mercutio fight with Tybalt? tt7 Go OR 11. How does Romeo try to stop with fight between Mercutio and Tybalt? What is the result of his action? MeßCV-ao -p Sap HIM 12. Why does Mercutio curse the houses of the feuding families, saying "A plague a' both your houses!" 13. A frustrated curse on both sides of an argument. From Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, 1592: A plague o' both your houses! Is he gone, and hath nothing? The houses are those of the Montague and Capulet families, the feud between whom caused Juliet so much grief and was the source of her ' O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo ' speech.

ROMEO tries to break up the fight. TYBALT reaches under ROMEO ’s arm and stabs MERCUTIO. TYBALT, PETRUCHIO , and the other CAPULETS exit. A plague o' both your houses! May a plague curse both your families. Did he get away clean? It’s a scratch, just a scratch. No, ’tis not so deep as a well nor so wide as a church-door, but ’tis ... Romeo ordered Tybalt and Mercutio to stop fighting and that didn't work, so Romeo stood in between Tybalt and Mercutio . Tybalt sweeps his sword under Romeo's arm and stabs Mercutio and is wounded After Mercutio is wonded, he cries out "A curse to both your houses!" Mercutio is throwing a frustrated curse on both sides of the argument. He wishes bad luck upon the Capulets and the Montagues. It's repeated for effect and shows that Mercutio is connected to both families whether its being related or just a friend. Oct 25, 2011 · The rules haven't changed in a few decades, but the customs have. In both houses of Congress, you still need a majority (50%+1) to pass a bill. In the House of Representatives, that's the only consideration. Apr 21, 2008 · When Mercutio says "A plague o' both your houses!," he is basically saying curse both the Montagues and the Capulets for what has happened to him; both families should be ashamed of themselves for feuding. And when he says, "They have made worms' meat out of me.", he means that they have made him useless like "worms' meat".

Mercutio is badly hurted after the fight with Tybalt. He tells Romeo that he will be a grave man by tomorrow which means he will be dead by tomorrow. 5. Why does Mercutio keep repeating, “A plague o’ both your houses”? Mercutio repeat this curse to the two household when he is dying. Why does mercutio curse both the montagues and Capulets? Because of their feud, they got into yet another fight and Mercutio was mortally wounded by Tybalt. Asked in William Shakespeare , Romeo ... MERCUTIO. So, if there were two men such as you, it wouldn’t take long for there to be none, because each of you would kill the other. Why, you would fight with a man if he had one more or one less hair in his beard than you have in yours.

What does mercutio mean by " a plague o' both your houses"? ... In the above quote, Mercutio is cursing both the Capulet and the Montague families. He blames their ... of energy and delight. When Mercutio is about to take his last breath, he says that “A plague o’ both your houses. They have made worm’ meat of me. I have it, and soundly, too. Your houses!” (Shakespeare 939). Instead of blaming on the Couplets, Mercutio dies cursing both Montagues and Capulets. This may be regarded as a change because Mercutio ignores Tybalt. Mercutio tries to be polite and civil. Mercutio insults Tybalt and tries to get him angry. Mercutio is angry but holds his tongue. Why does Romeo refuse to fight Tybalt? _____ Explain what happens when Romeo tries to stop the fight. _____ After Mercutio is wounded, he twice cries out, “A curse on both your houses!”

When Romeo tries to intervene, Tybalt stabs and kills Mercutio. As he is dying, Mercutio delivers the line, "A plague o' both your houses" since he blames both families for the events leading to his death. As it turns out, both families suffer more than their share of tragedies in the coming hours. What does Mercutio mean when he says, "A plague a both your houses!/They have made worms' meat of me." ... Curse both the Capulets and the Montegues. It has killed me. ROMEO tries to break up the fight. TYBALT reaches under ROMEO ’s arm and stabs MERCUTIO. TYBALT, PETRUCHIO , and the other CAPULETS exit. A plague o' both your houses! May a plague curse both your families. Did he get away clean? It’s a scratch, just a scratch. No, ’tis not so deep as a well nor so wide as a church-door, but ’tis ...

What does mercutio mean by " a plague o' both your houses"? ... In the above quote, Mercutio is cursing both the Capulet and the Montague families. He blames their ... ROMEO and JULIET Questions - Act III. Scene 1 1. Why does Benvolio want to leave the square at the beginning of this scene? 2. Why doesn’t Romeo want to fight Tybalt? 3. Why does Mercutio fight Tybalt? 4. Why does Mercutio curse both of the houses? 5. Why does the Prince just exile Romeo? Scene 2 6. Who does Juliet think is dead at first? 7. It means that Mercutio is cursing both of the houses (Montague and Capulet), and basically blaming both of them for his untimely death in A3S1. Romeo feels that he is to blame, and this is probably...

It still had the effect of a dying curse, alongside the desired one. In Fullmetal Alchemist during the annihilation of Ishval, Roy Mustang corners the injured leader of the Ishvallans. Mustang asks if he has something to say and, surrounded by his destroyed city, the old man answers smiling: "I curse you." Apr 21, 2008 · When Mercutio says "A plague o' both your houses!," he is basically saying curse both the Montagues and the Capulets for what has happened to him; both families should be ashamed of themselves for feuding. And when he says, "They have made worms' meat out of me.", he means that they have made him useless like "worms' meat". May 25, 2018 · I don’t really agree with the assertion that Romeo caused Mercutio’s death. I would argue that he tried to prevent it. That said, I can argue your side by pointing out that Mercutio was only out and about and likely to encounter Tybalt because he ... "A plague o' both your houses," is a curse. Mercutio is renouncing any and all allegiance he previously had to the Montague house and cursing both houses indiscriminately. He does this because he believes that it is the feud that has lead to his death and he wants to symbolically get revenge.

It means that Mercutio is cursing both of the houses (Montague and Capulet), and basically blaming both of them for his untimely death in A3S1. Romeo feels that he is to blame, and this is probably why he kills Tybalt. What did Capulet mean when he said, “Wife, we scarce thought is blessed, That God had lent us but this only child, But now I see the one is one too much, And that we have a curse in having her”? He means that Juliet is causing more trouble than she is worth. Who said, “a plague on both your house” and why? Mercutio. Nov 14, 2008 · He is bascally saying "I curse both of you". By "houses" he means families. He is expressing his extreme displeasure with both parties (both of the feuding families) in this dispute. (Mercutio does not belong to either one, I might add.) He is a bystander in the feud, although he is a friend of Romeo's.

MERCUTIO I am hurt. A plague o' both your houses! I am sped. Is he gone and hath nothing? MERCUTIO I’ve been hurt. May a plague curse both your families. I’m finished. Did he get away clean? BENVOLIO What, art thou hurt? BENVOLIO What, are you hurt? MERCUTIO Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch. Marry, ’tis enough. Where is my page?—Go, villain ... i’m sorry that you weren’t truly loved and that it made you cruel | a tycutio playlist, based off a plot where tybalt and mercutio were young lovers, but their love didn’t last under the strain of living in a city like verona, and them being forced to become who they are to survive.

May 22, 2008 · Look at it as dramatic foreshadowing; Mercutio's death rant is presaging the very real tragedy that will fall upon both houses. The most culpable party in Mercutio's death might just be in his own family. Why does the prince allow this feud to go on for so long, and when it's finally time to enforce a punishment, why does it all fall on Romeo ... Before Mercutio dies, he lays a curse on both the Montagues and the Capulets. The Capulet House is the house of Tybalt, the person who stabbed Mercutio. The Montague House is the house of Romeo, the person who blocked Mercutio’s view allowing Tybalt to stab him. Mercutio, being of royal blood, is not bound to either house.

What does mercutio mean by " a plague o' both your houses"? ... In the above quote, Mercutio is cursing both the Capulet and the Montague families. He blames their ... May 22, 2008 · Look at it as dramatic foreshadowing; Mercutio's death rant is presaging the very real tragedy that will fall upon both houses. The most culpable party in Mercutio's death might just be in his own family. Why does the prince allow this feud to go on for so long, and when it's finally time to enforce a punishment, why does it all fall on Romeo ... How is Mercutio stabbed? When Romeo tries to stop the fight. To the very end, Mercutio retains his wit. Give an example of a pun in . Lines 98-99. “Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man.” What curse does Mercutio pronounce as he is dying? “A plague on both your houses.” Why does Romeo decide to fight Tybalt?

Mar 10, 2018 · And arguably Mercutio does say nothing. Certainly nothing of any real consequence, it seems, until he is on his deathbed; then he cries “a plague on both your houses!” . But even then, he follows it with puns and jokes, returning to the flippancy and free-running nature of his speech that we have come to know so well. What does Mercutio mean when he says, "A plague a both your houses!/They have made worms' meat of me." ... Curse both the Capulets and the Montegues. It has killed me. It still had the effect of a dying curse, alongside the desired one. In Fullmetal Alchemist during the annihilation of Ishval, Roy Mustang corners the injured leader of the Ishvallans. Mustang asks if he has something to say and, surrounded by his destroyed city, the old man answers smiling: "I curse you."

Where in Italy does thins take place? Verona, Italy: What were Mercutio’s last words? “Help me into some houses, Benvolio, or I shall faint. A plague on both your houses! They have made worms’ meat of me. I have it, and soundly too. Your houses!” Why does Lord Capulet threaten to disown Juliet? She doesn’t want to marry Paris Mercutio curses the young men because he was not a part of either The Capulet or Montague family, and yet he was the one who suffered for the quarrel bewtween them. He was stabbed by Tybalt while... It's one of the few scenes where Romeo mans up and stops whining in long winded monologues. And it also is great, because Mercutio calls Romeo out on his being an emotional creeper, "Why the devil came you between us? I was hurt under your arm" (III.i.101-102), and the Montagues and the Capulets on their stupid feud, "A plague a both your houses!" Why does . Mercutio’s. speech “a plague o both your houses” reflect one of the major themes of the play? With . Mercutio’s. curse on both houses, fate. rears its head once again. Tragic events are foretold for both the . Montagues. and the . Capulets – a . foreshadowing. of the deaths or Romeo and Juliet and the tragedy that can come ...

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Mercutio ignores Tybalt. Mercutio tries to be polite and civil. Mercutio insults Tybalt and tries to get him angry. Mercutio is angry but holds his tongue. Why does Romeo refuse to fight Tybalt? _____ Explain what happens when Romeo tries to stop the fight. _____ After Mercutio is wounded, he twice cries out, “A curse on both your houses!”

MERCUTIO 105 Help me into some house, Benvolio, 106 Or I shall faint. A plague o' both your houses! 107 They have made worms' meat of me: I have it, 108 And soundly too. Your houses! Exeunt [Mercutio and Benvolio]. ROMEO Mercutio curses both the Capulets and Montagues as he dies in Act 3, Scene 1. His curse "a plague o' both your houses!" shows that he blames the two families for killing him. Mercutio believes that he had to fight Tybalt to protect the Montague reputation.

It means that Mercutio is cursing both of the houses (Montague and Capulet), and basically blaming both of them for his untimely death in A3S1. Romeo feels that he is to blame, and this is probably...

Why would Mercutio curse both the Capulets and the Montagues? Mercutio's line is, put simply, a curse on both the Capulet and the Montague families. Mercutio's curse is because he blames the feud between the Capulets and the Montagues for his death - and he realises that he is dying. It's one of the few scenes where Romeo mans up and stops whining in long winded monologues. And it also is great, because Mercutio calls Romeo out on his being an emotional creeper, "Why the devil came you between us? I was hurt under your arm" (III.i.101-102), and the Montagues and the Capulets on their stupid feud, "A plague a both your houses!"

May 04, 2009 · If I remember correctly, it was because a Capulet stabbed him in a fight vs the Montagues. So the feud between the Capulets and the Montagues caused his death so he was upset at them both. He...

This shows that Mercutio does not believe in fate and that he is shattered by Romeo helping Tybalt and not him. Mercutio asks Benvolio to help him and turns away from Romeo. This shows how enraged he is with Romeo. He says ‘a plague on both your houses’ three times, which is a magic number associated with mystical, supernatural things.

"A plague o' both your houses," is a curse. Mercutio is renouncing any and all allegiance he previously had to the Montague house and cursing both houses indiscriminately. He does this because he believes that it is the feud that has lead to his death and he wants to symbolically get revenge.

Read the excerpt from Act III, scene i of Romeo and Juliet. Mercutio: No, ’tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door; but ’tis enough, ’twill serve: ask for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered, I warrant, for this world. A plague o’ both your houses! Mercutio, chagrined and disgusted, cries "a plague a' both your houses"—the feuding houses of Capulet and Montague—and complains that Tybalt has escaped unscathed. Shortly, after Mercutio has died... .

Romeo tries to keep the peace & break up Mercutio & Tybalt by putting himself in between them; as a result, Tybalt tries to kill Romeo but misses & stabs Mercutio 7. Describe Mercutio’s actions when he realizes he is fatally wounded. Mercutio places a curse on the Montagues & Capulets – “a plague a’ both your houses” (foreshadowing) 8.